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Bed Bug Close Up

Post date: April 26th, 2013

bed-bug-on-a-stick
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Battling bed bugs with extreme heat

Post date: October 22nd, 2014

Updated: Tuesday, October 21 2014, 08:55 PM CDT

Reported by: Donna Kirker Morgan

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- When bed bugs started to spread in the United States 10 years ago there was really nothing very effective at getting rid of the nasty pests.

Exterminators have been working for years to figure out what's best to get rid of the bugs, but including using a non-chemical solution.

Bed bugs don't survive in extreme cold or heat, and that's why if bed bugs are suspected between your sheets, run your bedding through a clothes dryer and high for a full cycle.

Heat has the ability to kill all three stages of bed bugs, but some chemicals don't damage the eggs.

That's why some exterminators are turning to Entotherm. The process can kill bed bugs in four hours with temperatures between 120 and 140 degrees.

The process has been used in bedrooms, hotel rooms and offices.

Normal bed bug treatments take three parts, but the Entotherm is a one-shot deal.

The Entotherm process starts with exterminators sealing off an area and removing anything that may explode or not do well in heat. Sensitive electronics are also covered and drawers are opened to improve airflow, with all clutter moved off the ground.


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Battling bed bugs with extreme heat
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Bed bugs found at Lima Senior

Post date: October 19th, 2014

Professional exterminators are fighting the spread of bed bugs at Lima Senior High School.

Superintendent Jill Ackerman says there have been reports of possible bed bugs at the school for the last two weeks. Exterminators were brought in twice to spray rooms in the building, including over the weekend. Nurse Kate Morman says two rooms were identified as the main areas of concern, however, some common areas were sprayed as well. Ackerman says the bed bugs are believed to have been inadvertently brought in by a student.

Bed bugs are small reddish brown bugs which feed on human blood. They tend to prefer dark places and can lay up to 50 eggs at a time. Bed bug bites can cause a reaction like a mosquito bite. However, they are not known to transmit disease.

A letter concerning bed bugs and other hazards, such as hand foot and mouth disease, that spread in places like schools is being sent home with students.


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[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wf4S_HF0jVQ]
Cockroach youngin surviving hair shampoo in last attempt to find food
10-15-14: After taking dozens of bed bug pictures, today was a break of sorts. This young cockroach was seen on the side wall of the toilet after I woke up f...

By:
Ruben Ciriacks

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Cockroach youngin surviving hair shampoo in last attempt to find food - Video
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Researchers are starting to explain the anxiety many victims feel.

Right now, everything I own is in garbage bags piled up in the middle of my kitchen and bathroom and filling my shower. It's been that way for a week and a half and will continue to be so for at least another week on top of that. If you live in a major city, you might know whats coming. If not, welcome to the hell that is bed bugs.

This isn't the first time I've had bed bugs. Nor the second. It's the third, and this time its taken two visits from the exterminators to (hopefully) rid our apartment of the tiny beasts. Luckily we were able to catch the bugs early before they got a real hold on the apartment. Unluckily, thats mostly because rather than mosquito-esque little bumps, my bites turn into hardened ping-pong ball sized welts that itch for over a week. So when we have bed bugs, I know pretty quickly. And each time everything goes into bags. I stop sleeping. I avoid furniture on the street. I refuse to enter libraries.

I used to joke that I had bed bug PTSD. Theres a certain kind of anxiety that the seemingly invisible biters incite. But in fact, it might not be a joke. Research is starting to show that bed bug infections can leave people with anxiety, depression, and paranoia. And thats normal. In fact, it would be weird for you not to be freaked out, says Stphane Perron, a doctor and researcher at the University of Montreal. If you have bed bugs, and if you dont care, thats not a normal reaction. You should be worried. I would consider it a normal reaction to a stressor.

Perron has published a number of papers on the psychological ramifications of bed bugs. In one study, he and his team looked at apartments that had been reported to the Montreal Public Health Department for unsafe conditions. Some of those units were infested with bedbugs, but not all of them. Perron and his team gave the tenants of these buildings a series of questionnaires that assessed all sorts of health impacts, including psychological ones. All told, 39 of the units had bed bugs, and 52 of them didnt. When they compared the psychological results between those two samplesa method that helps to control for factors that impact mental health like socioeconomic statusthey found that tenants with bed bugs were far more likely to report anxiety and sleep disturbances than those without.

Another study by medical entomologist Jerome Goddard at Mississippi State University examined posts on bed bug related websites like Bedbugger.com. When they compared those posts against a checklist of PTSD symptoms they found that 81 percent of people writing these forum posts were describing psychological and emotional effects often associated with the disorder, things like hyper-vigilance, paranoia, obsessive thoughts, and depression. One person scored high enough to actually be considered a PTSD patient, Goddard says. (The comparison they did here isn't diagnostic. In other words, Goddard can't actually diagnose anybody with PTSD from the results.)

In another study, researchers sent out questionnaires to seven different cities. They got 474 back. In the survey, they asked people to describe their reaction to the bites. Beyond the physical reactions, 29 percent of people said they suffered from insomnia, 22 percent reported emotional distress, and 20 percent said they had anxiety due to the bugs.

There are a number of reasons to take these preliminary studies with a grain of salt. For one, researchers dont know anything about the mental state of the participants before they got bed bugs. And thats important. In one case study that Perron published, a woman with a prior history of mental health issues got bed bugs and eventually committed suicide. The bed bug is a stressor like many other stressors, Perron says. For people who are vulnerable, it may result in having a pathological fear of bedbugs or even delusions of parasitosis, when a person falsely believes they are infested with bugs. So knowing the mental state of people before they were infected is key, and missing in these early reports.

It's early days for studies like these, and Goddard is the first to admit that they arent perfect. But they're a start. I think all these things sort of added together, suggest that at least bed bugs are associated with anxiety and sleep disturbance, he says. Now whether or not a person can truly have PTSD I dont know. And they do suggest that theres something particular about bed bugs that sets them apart from other biting insects like tics, fleas, mosquitos, and chiggers.

When I tell people I have bed bugs, they say things like, So, youre setting fire to everything you own, right? The EPA acknowledges the urge. There is no need to throw out all of your things, they assure visitors to their bed bug information page. But after weeks of garbage-bag living, the prospect of just lighting it all on fire and leaving doesnt seem so unreasonable. And several bed bug studies note the extreme lengths to which people go to get rid of the bugseverything from actually setting things on fire, to attempting to self-treat with loads of toxic chemicals. Even my exterminators are aware of the trauma the bugs incite. At the bottom of the two-page preparation guide for treatment, they write:


Read more from the original source: Bed Bug Madness: The Psychological Toll of the Blood Suckers
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Despite news that reported bedbug infestations have dropped significantly since 2010, this summer was still fraught with bedbug hysteria, spurred in part to the discovery of a few infested N train conductor cabs. That, naturally, sparked an onslaught of BEDBUGS ON THE SUBWAY-related hysteria, with trains getting pulled out of service left and right thanks to reported bug sightings.

We spoke with Lou Sorkin, the American Museum of Natural History's resident entomologist, about whether or not all this bedbug hysteria is unwarranted. He says that though officials believe we're winning this bedbug war, that may not be the case. "[Infestations] are just not being reported as much as they used to be," he told us. "And a lot of the reporters or writers who investigated this went off of the 311 calls that dropped off from a high point before, so they interpreted that as fewer bed bug calls meaning fewer bed bug infestations. But its just that people didnt call, thats all."

Then again, Sorkin cautions that these so-called subway bedbug sightings might not be what they seem. "I think people are overreacting, because theyre not really sure what bed bugs look like for the most part. They can misidentify anything they see as a bed bug," he said. "A lot of the infestations that were identified were where the conductors were sitting, it wasnt the public area." And it turns out there are a whole host of bugs that are often mistaken for bedbugs in homes and even on the subwayhere are some common ones, and if you spy one of these guys in your apartment or on the F train, try not to freak out.

GERMAN COCKROACH NYMPH

Most experienced city dwellers are regrettably familiar enough with the adult cockroach not to mistake it for a tiny bedbug. But Sorkin says it's actually fairly common for people to misidentify roach nymphs, which are wingless, smaller and less recognizable in color. "Cockroach nymphs [are] smallish and dark are sometimes mistaken for bed bugs," Sorkin told us. "Basically what it comes down to is that people dont really know what bed bugs look like, so anything that moves can be identified as a bed bug, especially if they find it in their bed." Unfortunately, a roach infestation can be pretty hard to eradicate, and if you've got one it might be a good idea to call in the pros.

DRUGSTORE BEETLE

I found one of these guys crawling on my pillow last summer, resulting in a sleepless night spent on Bedbugger trying to determine if this tiny brown thing was indeed a dreaded Bedbug. And I'm not the only one who's been tricked by the dreaded Drugstore/cigarette beetle, which earns its name thanks to its tendency to infest stored products and old timey pharmaceutical herbs. Sorkin says these guys are often mistaken for bedbugs, and their infestations are no trifling matter. "You have to find out what theyre infesting. It could be potpourri, which is common. They like spices, so paprika is a pretty commonly infested thing," he told us, adding that they also go after dried plants.

On the (maybe?) bright side, if you're finding suspicious bites on your body and notice your apartment's filled with drugstore beetles, don't panic over bedbugs just yetSorkin says drugstore/cigarette beetles can have wasp parasites in their population, and these tiny little creatures leave stings that can be misidentified as bedbug bites. "To complicate matters, the female wasps are wingless so many people misidentify those little wasps as ants, and dont think of them as something that can sting," Sorkin said. "They put baits out to get rid of ants, and even pest control companies will come in and misidentify them." Bugs are such tricksters!

CARPET BEETLE

A carpet beetle is another faux-bedbug culprit. Though these little guys don't necessarily look like bedbugs"Theyre differently colored, more compact, and they have brown, yellow, orange scales on their bodies," per Sorkincarpet beetle larvae have little hairs that can cause skin reactions similar to bedbug bites. Popular bedbug resource site Bedbugger has forums filled with stories about people who panicked over potential bug bites, only to discover they were merely suffering from an allergic reaction to these fuzzy things. "People also find shed skins of carpet beetle larvae and think those are the shed skins of [bedbug] nymphs," Sorkin told us.


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What's Eating You? A Short Guide To Bedbugs & Bedbug Impostors In NYC
Category: Bed Bug Nymphs Author : admin
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How Well Do 'Natural' Bed Bug Pesticides Work?

Post date: October 14th, 2014

October 13, 2014

Provided by Entomology Today

Concerns over human-insecticide exposure has stimulated the development of alternative bed bug control materials, and many essential oil-based pesticides and detergent insecticides have been developed in recent years. But how well do they work? To find out, researchers from Rutgers University evaluated the efficacy of nine essential oil-based products and two detergents that are labeled and marketed for bed bug control. The results are published in an article in the Journal of Economic Entomology.

The non-synthetic bed bug pesticides which contain ingredients such as geraniol, rosemary oil, mint oil, cinnamon oil, peppermint oil, eugenol, clove oil, lemongrass oil, sodium lauryl sulfate, 2-Phenethyl propionate, potassium sorbate, and sodium chloride included the following products:

Bed Bug 911 Bed Bug Bully Bed Bug Fix Bed Bug Patrol Ecoexempt IC2 EcoRaider Eradicator Essentria Rest Assured Green Rest Easy Stop Bugging Me

When the researchers sprayed the 11 non-synthetic pesticides directly on bed bug nymphs, they found that only two EcoRaider (1% geraniol, 1% cedar extract, and 2% sodium lauryl sulfate) and Bed Bug Patrol (0.003% clove oil, 1% peppermint oil, and 1.3% sodium lauryl sulfate) killed more than 90 percent of them. None of the non-synthetic insecticides had any noticeable effect against bed bug eggs except for EcoRaider, which killed 87 percent of them.

While these lab results may seem promising, the effectiveness of both products is probably much lower in actual settings because it is extremely difficult to spray any product directly on bed bugs because of their ability to hide in tiny cracks and crevices.

Under field conditions, bed bugs hide in cracks, crevices, creases, and many other places where insecticide application may not be directly applied onto the hidden insects, the authors wrote. Additional studies under field conditions are warranted to determine the field efficacy of EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol and how they can be incorporated into a bed bug management program.

Curiously, some of the active ingredients in EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol are also found in some of the other tested products that exhibited very low rates of efficacy, an indication that the products inactive ingredients are also important.

Other factors besides the active ingredients must have accounted for the high efficacy of some essential oil-based pesticides, the authors wrote. Adjuvants such as wetting agents, spreaders, stabilizers, defoamers, stickers, and solvents may produce synergistic effects to essential oils by improving penetration through insect cuticle and translocation of the active ingredients within insect body.


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How Well Do 'Natural' Bed Bug Pesticides Work?
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Concerns over human-insecticide exposure has stimulated the development of alternative bed bug control materials, and many essential oil-based pesticides and detergent insecticides have been developed in recent years. But how well do they work? To find out, researchers from Rutgers University evaluated the efficacy of nine essential oil-based products and two detergents that are labeled and marketed for bed bug control. The results are published in an article in the Journal of Economic Entomology.

The non-synthetic bed bug pesticides which contain ingredients such as geraniol, rosemary oil, mint oil, cinnamon oil, peppermint oil, eugenol, clove oil, lemongrass oil, sodium lauryl sulfate, 2-Phenethyl propionate, potassium sorbate, and sodium chloride included the following products:

When the researchers sprayed the 11 non-synthetic pesticides directly on bed bug nymphs, they found that only two EcoRaider (1% geraniol, 1% cedar extract, and 2% sodium lauryl sulfate) and Bed Bug Patrol (0.003% clove oil, 1% peppermint oil, and 1.3% sodium lauryl sulfate) killed more than 90 percent of them. None of the non-synthetic insecticides had any noticeable effect against bed bug eggs except for EcoRaider, which killed 87 percent of them.

While these lab results may seem promising, the effectiveness of both products is probably much lower in actual settings because it is extremely difficult to spray any product directly on bed bugs because of their ability to hide in tiny cracks and crevices.

"Under field conditions, bed bugs hide in cracks, crevices, creases, and many other places where insecticide application may not be directly applied onto the hidden insects," the authors wrote. "Additional studies under field conditions are warranted to determine the field efficacy of EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol and how they can be incorporated into a bed bug management program."

Curiously, some of the active ingredients in EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol are also found in some of the other tested products that exhibited very low rates of efficacy, an indication that the products' inactive ingredients are also important.

"Other factors besides the active ingredients must have accounted for the high efficacy of some essential oil-based pesticides," the authors wrote. "Adjuvants such as wetting agents, spreaders, stabilizers, defoamers, stickers, and solvents may produce synergistic effects to essential oils by improving penetration through insect cuticle and translocation of the active ingredients within insect body."


See the original post here: Scientists evaluate efficacy of non-synthetic bed bug pesticides
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Cimex lectularius is the common bedbug which feeds on human blood. This insect is active at night and usually feeds on you without your knowledge. Many times the insect resides on the house at dark and warm places like beds and mats. Allergy, skin rash and itchy patches are some of the common symptoms of bed bug bites.

Treatment of bed bug bites involves two factors namely identifying the insect and treating the infection. Bed bugs are human parasites that feed on our blood. A person infected with bed bug bites may lead to various types of skin infections and sometimes may even cause blisters. Bed bugs can enter your house in number of ways. It can be infested from pets, clothing, and other houses and through infested items. It can also infect your pets when you take them to neighboring houses or market. The insect lays eggs on the dwellings and very often exist as groups. It is difficult to spot them and hence it can grow and multiply infecting people in the house. The insects are attached to moist surfaces which is dark.

Staying in healthy atmosphere and following healthy lifestyle can prevent you from getting infested from bed bug bites. Generally the infection from bedbug does not require any medication. Eradicate the bugs totally from the house using pesticide can help you to overcome bed bug bites.

Pictures of Bed Bug Bites :

Images, Pictures, pics and Photos of Bed Bug Bites


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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

12-Oct-2014

Contact: Richard Levine rlevine@entsoc.org 301-731-4535 Entomological Society of America @EntsocAmerica

Concerns over human-insecticide exposure has stimulated the development of alternative bed bug control materials, and many essential oil-based pesticides and detergent insecticides have been developed in recent years. But how well do they work? To find out, researchers from Rutgers University evaluated the efficacy of nine essential oil-based products and two detergents that are labeled and marketed for bed bug control. The results are published in an article in the Journal of Economic Entomology.

The non-synthetic bed bug pesticides which contain ingredients such as geraniol, rosemary oil, mint oil, cinnamon oil, peppermint oil, eugenol, clove oil, lemongrass oil, sodium lauryl sulfate, 2-Phenethyl propionate, potassium sorbate, and sodium chloride included the following products:

When the researchers sprayed the 11 non-synthetic pesticides directly on bed bug nymphs, they found that only two EcoRaider (1% geraniol, 1% cedar extract, and 2% sodium lauryl sulfate) and Bed Bug Patrol (0.003% clove oil, 1% peppermint oil, and 1.3% sodium lauryl sulfate) killed more than 90 percent of them. None of the non-synthetic insecticides had any noticeable effect against bed bug eggs except for EcoRaider, which killed 87 percent of them.

While these lab results may seem promising, the effectiveness of both products is probably much lower in actual settings because it is extremely difficult to spray any product directly on bed bugs because of their ability to hide in tiny cracks and crevices.

"Under field conditions, bed bugs hide in cracks, crevices, creases, and many other places where insecticide application may not be directly applied onto the hidden insects," the authors wrote. "Additional studies under field conditions are warranted to determine the field efficacy of EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol and how they can be incorporated into a bed bug management program."

Curiously, some of the active ingredients in EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol are also found in some of the other tested products that exhibited very low rates of efficacy, an indication that the products' inactive ingredients are also important.

"Other factors besides the active ingredients must have accounted for the high efficacy of some essential oil-based pesticides," the authors wrote. "Adjuvants such as wetting agents, spreaders, stabilizers, defoamers, stickers, and solvents may produce synergistic effects to essential oils by improving penetration through insect cuticle and translocation of the active ingredients within insect body."


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Researchers compare efficacy of 'natural' bed bug pesticides
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