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[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jGm8widTEY] 04-11-2011 13:10 Rose Board Certified Entomologist Mark "Shep" Sheperdigian describes the the stages of a bed bugs life and how to identify bed bugs. www.rosepestsolutions.com

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K-9 Training Chicago – Felon – Video

Post date: January 7th, 2013

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYre5aqn4-U] K-9 Training Chicago provides training for bedbug-sniffing dogs, and the results are amazingly accurate. Entomology researchers at the University of Florida report that well-trained dogs can detect a single live bug or egg with 96 percent accuracy. Detector dogs are useful for locating bed bugs because they use olfaction rather than vision

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Weegee's Killer Decade

Post date: January 7th, 2013

Steps away from the sanitized, commercialized and pacified Times Square is a portal to a sinister urban past, where two-bit hoods lay sprawled in pools of blood with stogies clenched in their lifeless jaws, watched over by the police and the curious alike. It’s a world of men with guns and hats who played their final hands under elevated tracks and tenements that have long since vanished.

A sprawling show devoted to an intense decade in the city’s history opens Friday at the International Center of Photography. “Weegee: Murder Is My Business” delivers on its promise, and then some, showcasing the work of the legendary photographer Arthur Fellig from 1935 to 1946.  He had a knack for being in the right place at the right time. More importantly, he had a unique visual style – like in his photo of a Little Italy homicide titled “Balcony Seats at a Murder.” Transcending the just-the-facts approach of routine police crime scene photography, he captured the details and drama, the humor and the horror, along the city’s streets.

Though some images turn on sight gags and ironic puns, there are many more that show an unmatched and unsentimental feel for the streets and its denizens. While Weegee could be equal parts huckster and hustler, he was also dedicated to his work, said Brian Wallis, the show’s curator.

“One of the things we wanted to correct with this show was that view of him as a naïf or a buffoon, who just happened to take pictures,” he said. “He was a serious and well-respected photographer who worked in a tradition that was denigrated as tabloid photography. He didn’t know the world of museums and galleries, but he did know one thing very well: the streets of New York. He took that seriously.”

Strains of jazz and police sirens waft through the center’s galleries, where visitors descend a staircase, under a replica of the big gun sign that marked where Weegee once lived — across Center Street from the old police headquarters. It leads to a re-creation – tidied and spartan – of his old room, down to the scanner, tear sheets and can of bed bug killer. You can almost smell the cigar smoke – though in the city today, that now passes for a crime in most places.

The re-creation of his room is fitting for a man who sort of created himself. Mr. Wallis explained how Weegee had seen himself as a photo detective, inhabiting the world of cops and journalists. The show starts with images of Weegee at crime scenes – including a mid-1930s spread from Life Magazine where he documented a criminal’s journey from arrest to jailing.

He was the model.

“He set up the shots with his buddies from the police department,” Mr. Wallis said. “The editors at Life said ‘This is fantastic, but it’s not what we hired you to do. The story is you.’ So they ran a story on him. From then on, he was off to the races.”

Mr. Wallis said Weegee stood out among other photographers in a city saturated with newspaper shooters by working freelance and at night. The former gave him flexibility. That latter gave him opportunity.

“What happened at night?” Mr. Wallis said. “People get shot. People get drunk. People get in car wrecks. He established a niche and specialty.”

The arrival of the groundbreaking newspaper, PM, gave him a venue for regular and more ambitious work.  With Ralph Steiner as the photo editor, Weegee’s work took a dimension of storytelling that had been absent from his earlier output.

“Most murders he took one shot, three at most,” Mr. Wallis said. “At PM, he did some of his best work. They gave him free rein, he had input on how the pictures were laid out, how the captions read and the story, too. And since it was a daily, he was cranking it out.”

Such experiences would hint at his other work, that showed the city beyond the blood: where European immigrants and migrants from down South settled into teeming blocks, where the Depression was beginning to lift, gangsters were fighting for turf and the world was at war.  A broader view is hinted at in a part of the exhibit that details his 1941 show at the Photo League.

The world of earnest, political photographers exemplified by the Photo League might seem an odd fit for Weegee, though not in Mr. Wallis’ consideration.

“How could he fit in with what they were trying to do?” Mr. Wallis said. “The Photo League had a street-level view of working-class New York. They documented the people, though they tended to be romantic. Weegee had an unvarnished take.”

Among the final images in the show are various tear sheets from PM. They are yellowed and look brittle. Above them is an array of images, some light, others serious. They show the city – bustling, noisy, crazy – from wayward cars, revelers at a bar and summer crowds at Coney Island. A headline to one spread offers a fitting coda:

These Are Real People Showing Emotion.

Follow @nytimesphoto and @dgbxny on Twitter.

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Bedbug Chasers In the past few years, stories of bedbug infestations have become media staples, and with good reason: The little buggers, which hide in mattress crevices and need a "blood meal" to finish their mating cycle, have returned in force to all 50 states, despite having been almost eradicated in the U.S. in the 20th century. The reason they're back? The new generation of bugs are not native to North America, and after decades of being sprayed with DDT and other powerful insecticides in Asia and other less-regulated parts of the world, they are resistant to most chemicals.

"I think bedbugs are far from overhyped," says Dean Averna, who rediscovered a secret weapon that was used almost a century ago to chase bedbugs from mattresses: heat.

Adult bedbugs die at 118 degrees, and eggs and nymphs shrivel up at 122. Averna, who worked for many years in the infrastructure and critical power industry, saw opportunity in this knowledge. While other companies use the method to rid homes of bedbugs, they lack efficiency, requiring up to four 100- to 200-pound heating units to treat just 700 square feet. And since the large units take eight or nine hours to thoroughly heat an area, the bugs have time to take refuge in walls, crawl spaces or a neighboring apartment. "More often than not they have to come in a second time," Averna says of his competition. "Just one surviving pregnant female can create 13,000 bedbugs in six months and restart the entire infestation."

Averna spent 18 months developing a new heater, one that is only 72 pounds and easily portable; multiple units quickly and evenly heat an entire apartment floor. He works with landlords and hotel owners to treat whole floors to prevent reinfestation. Instead of billing the client for power, Bedbug Chasers brings its own generators to run the machines. Armed with the super heater, the franchise earlier this year became the first to specialize in bedbug removal. Averna is in talks to open 24 units.

Franchisees don't have to pony up for a full truckload of heaters. While most buy four or six for everyday operations, Bedbug Chasers also has regional depots where franchisees can rent more heaters for larger jobs.

While the heaters can control other insects as well, Averna says he does not want to be a full-spectrum pest-control company, and says most business will come from subcontracting with exterminators who don't want to invest in their own heaters. "We're in a good niche position," says Averna, who thinks bedbugs will probably not be eradicated anytime soon. "We come in there like the Ghostbusters and take care of business."

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Bed Bug Chasers Franchise Keeps Focus on its Niche
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[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuojEatK1KA] Discovered bed bugs at the Wingate by Wyndham Regina hotel during a business trip in October 2011. More info in this review: www.tripadvisor.ca IMAGE 1: imageshack.us IMAGE 2: imageshack.us ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Stayed recently at the Wingate by Wyndham Regina for a business trip after reading about the positive reviews and amenities. What I can say is that this hotel offers a hot breakfast and a good location within the downtown area.

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Bed Bug Detection: What Do They Look Like?

Post date: January 6th, 2013

Bed Bug Detection: What Do They Look Like?

If you're like much of the populace, you are probably aware that bed bugs have been making a resurgence in recent years. Once eradicated, they are now back in full-force, ready to sneak up on you at night and feed on your blood while you sleep.

The role of physical attributes in bed bug detection

First and foremost, it is important that you know what bed bugs look like. These parasites are very small, growing only to around 5.5mm in adulthood, but they are still visible to the naked eye. They are tan in color and rather flat, unless they have fed. If they have recently ingested on blood, they'll be red and puffy. Once they hatch, they all have the same basic look through their seven life cycle stages.

The role of molting in bed bug detection

Each stage of a bed bug's life cycle is accompanied by the shedding of their old skin to allow for growth. This process is known as molting. Although these layers of shed skin are very small, they can still be seen, especially by a magnifying glass. The number of these skins that you see in a given area will indicate how many bed bugs you might be dealing with. However, they are probably too small to tell the difference between one life cycle and another.

The role of bites in bed bug detection

It is important that you know what bed bug bites look like, because this is very often the first sign of infestation that a homeowner will notice. Bed bug bites are presented as small red areas on your skin. They appear to be a small rash of some kind. Itching will occur at the location of the bite. If your skin is sensitive, its overall appearance could be much worse, along with the severity of the itching.

The role of fecal stains in bed bug detection

Bed bugs are known to hide in crevices and cracks inside your house. This includes furniture, which is why they received the moniker of "bed bugs." They can hide in a variety of places, and because they are very small, you might never actually see one up close and personal. This could prevent you from deciding whether or not an infestation has, in fact, taken place. To solve this problem, though, all it takes is a disposable latex glove or two. All you have to do is slip one on and slide your hand in the folds and crevices of your couch, bed, etc. Rub around the edges slowly, pressing down a bit, and take a look at the glove. If it comes back with black marks, this often indicates bed bug feces.

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We KILL Bed Bugs with Heat Treatments

Post date: January 6th, 2013

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzDXHVqK5L0] "The Bed Bug Guys" Jeff Berens and Chris Burnham use heat Thermal Remediation to kill Bed bugs, because Chemicals do not work effectively and leave behind a residue.

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[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSA-3M9kvUQ]
Bed Bug Bites - NJ Bed Bugs Exterminator
allstagespestcontrol.com nj bed bugs, bed bug bites, photos of bedbug, bites pictures. Until they #39;ve got experienced the bed bug bites, few people would know exactly what bed bugs are. We are able to describe these bug as small insect, oval in shape, that cannot fly. The actual adult bed bugs could be up to 7 millimeter long, and their colour is normally light-brown or brownish. It got its identify due to its tendency for being found in the places in which people normally rest such as under the bed, on the mattress or perhaps within the frame from the bed. These annoying little insects primarily feed with the blood of humans as well as small animals, typically at night. The intriguing thing is that the target does not feel the bedbug bites until the morning once they become clearly obvious and itchy. The actual affected person or pet cannot feel the bites considering the fact that the saliva associated with bed bugs contains anaesthetics. The bedbug bite skin breakouts normally appear about 60 minutes after the bite yet there are people that have the actual rashes shortly after a few days. This normally depends upon how the body might react to the chemical materials from the saliva. We are able to describe the bedbug bites as tiny and round, usually red colored. It is identical to the mosquito bite, however it is itchier and also the swelling is higher. Oftentimes, the bed bug bites are grouped or come in lines. This results in that the bugs were required to stop feeding ...From:njpestcontrolViews:4420 3ratingsTime:01:26More inPeople Blogs

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On Contact Solutions (http://www.oncontactsolutions.com), a supplier of scientifically-based green products to the hotel industry, is pleased to announce that it now offers Cimi-Shield, a revolutionary soybean extract spray that is non-toxic and prevents Bed Bug infestations for one year.

Miami, FL (PRWEB) February 27, 2013

In 2006, the Bed Bug Registry, a free, public database of user-submitted bed bug reports from across the United States and Canada, was founded (http://www.bedbugregistry.com/). Today, the Registry has collected 20,000 reports from 12,000 locations and states, "Until a reliable, safe pesticide becomes available, avoiding bed bug encounters will be the only reliable way to ensure they don't spread into your own home." Besides the horror of thousand of little bugs nibbling at you while you sleep, Bed Bugs have recently been found to carry MRSA, a drug-resistant bacterium that can lead to life-threatening infections (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/17/6/10-1978_article.htm).

Unfortunately, Bed Bug encounters are becoming harder and harder to avoid because traditional extermination methods only attack the problem after the bugs are reported by guests or hotel staff. In response, toxic chemicals are applied that kill the living bed bugs, leaving an untold number of eggs ready to hatch and reinfect the room in the future. Fortunately, a reliable and safe solution that prevents Bed Bug infestations by not only killing living bugs, but by killing the eggs that hatch for a year after treatment, has finally become available.

Called Cimi-Shield (or VA88), this non-toxic polypeptide protein molecule is derived from soybean oil. Because its ingredients, both active and inert, are demonstrably safe for its intended use, it is EPA 25b exempt, which means it is not subject to federal pesticide requirements. Cimi-Shield kills Bed Bugs by removing their outer waxy layer, causing them to dehydrate and die. Jeff Tomback, president of On Contact Solutions, says, "Now, hotels have the opportunity to prevent Bed Bug infestations before they start, ensuring guests that they will have a good night's sleep in a clean and safe room." As long as a hotel treats its rooms once a year, it will not have to worry about infestations, and guests won't have to perform a long list of preventive measures when they check into their rooms or worry about bringing Bed Bugs home with them."

Jeffrey Tomback On Contact Solutions 415-269-1903 Email Information


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